Author: CEA

Biofuels are becoming the principle technology in the decarbonisation of transport

Biofuels are the principle solution to emission reductions in the Transport sector for decades ahead, Climate Ethanol Alliance highlighted in delivering its message to key stakeholders at COP 23. Globally, the International Energy Agency reports that biofuels will supply a remarkable 93 percent of global renewable energy consumed in road travel by 2022, even with the addition of more EVs. Over that same period, global biofuel production is expected to increase at least 16 percent. By 2050, biofuels will deliver 42% of GHG savings in transport according to the International Energy Agency, confirming their position as the principle technology in transport...

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Climate Ethanol Alliance live on facebook at COP23 – WATCH

We were live at COP23 with Facebook discussing the role of Ethanol in making transport a climate friendly sector. Check out the link below!   Our panel was moderated by James Cogan of the Climate Ethanol Alliance and consisted of Chris Bliley of Growth Energy, Eric Sievers of Ethanol Europe Renewables and Emmanuel Desplechin of ePURE.   Watch the video...

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The forecast is warm for a future without biofuels

By Chris Bliley, Climate Ethanol Alliance at COP 23   Electricity generation is getting greener every year. Ongoing innovation and competitive economics make solar, wind, and biomass increasingly attractive to leaders who seek to pull our planet off a crash course with climate catastrophe. Unfortunately, the data show that an abundance of low-carbon electricity is not enough. The vast majority of the world’s transportation is powered by liquid fuels, which can offer superior power, range, and ease of storage and distribution.   That is why no effort to hold down global carbon emissions can succeed without aggressive measures to...

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Corn Ethanol Saves the Climate: The only question is by how much – Paper

Paper by Eric Sievers, Investment Director, Ethanol Europe Renewables   All the bad news about ethanol has been definitively disproven by data.  It is time to understand the vast lost carbon savings suffered by the planet due to the continuing use of petrol rather than ethanol.   Understanding Ethanol’s Carbon Intensity   The most sensitive assessment of the climate impacts of biofuels is consequential life cycle analysis, a highly detailed approach looking at a specific biofuel’s (and some would argue a specific quantity of that biofuel produced over a defined period of time) impact on a status quo situation...

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